Tag Archives: LARPing

LAGS Rule Book

Sarah Lawrence College

LAGS (Live Action Gaming System) – Rulebook

Edition 1.0

 

Table of Contents

LAGS……………………………………………………………………. 5

Introduction…………………………………………………………………………………………. 5

Background …………………………………………………………………………………………. 5

The World………………………………………………………………. 7

Combat………………………………………………………………………………………………. 7

Basic Rules………………………………………………………………………………………. 7

Calling Hits………………………………………………………………………………………………… 8

Dragging……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 8

Knocking out……………………………………………………………………………………………… 9

Armour……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 9

Healing……………………………………………………………………………………………… 10

Healing Techniques…………………………………………………………………………….. 11

Heal limbs………………………………………………………………………………………………… 11

Revive the dead………………………………………………………………………………………… 12

Safety……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 12

Weapons Safety………………………………………………………………………………… 12

Control and Lightest Touch……………………………………………………………………….. 13

Movement………………………………………………………………………………………………… 13

Honor………………………………………………………………………………………………. 13

Respect…………………………………………………………………………………………. 13

Starting play…………………………………………………………………………………………….. 14

Dress……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 14

Breaking the rules……………………………………………………………………………………… 15

Weapons……………………………………………………………….. 16

Types and combos………………………………………………………………………………… 16

Construction and Care………………………………………………………………………… 16

Materials…………………………………………………………………………………………………. 17

Building your boffer: (we need to make one and photograph each step as well as document the process)   17

Boffer……………………………………………………………………………………………. 17

Crossguard………………………………………………………………………………………………. 17

Axes……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 17

Alternative weapons…………………………………………………………………………………. 17

Building your Shield…………………………………………………………………………………. 17

Weapon care……………………………………………………………………………………. 18

Armor rules and construction………………………………………………………………… 18

Fighting………………………………………………………………… 19

Strategy……………………………………………………………………………………………. 19

Fighters…………………………………………………………………………………………. 19

Healers………………………………………………………………………………………….. 19

Training Exercises………………………………………………………………………………… 19

Line Battles……………………………………………………………………………………………… 19

Line Battles with Healers…………………………………………………………………………… 20

Rotations…………………………………………………………………………………………………. 20

Games………………………………………………………………………………………………. 20

Damsel in Distress Game……………………………………………………………………………. 20

Protect the King……………………………………………………………………………………….. 21

Holy Grail………………………………………………………………………………………………… 21

Robin Hood……………………………………………………………………………………………… 21

Wizard ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 22

Butterfly………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 22

LAGS

Introduction

LAGS, the Live Action Gaming System, pulls together the best parts of LARPing and cuts out the politics, the call for large numbers, and the unnecessary aspects of intense role playing. It is designed to provide a safe fighting outlet for those fans of fantasy and the medieval ages who just want to hit other people safely with swords. This manual encompasses all the information one needs to play using the LAGS methods, including simple rules for combat, safety, and honor; how to create one’s own weapon, and how to use it; and how an event may be set up.

Background

Live Action Role Play (LARP) is a type of RPG that, though it can take many forms, is essentially based in the art of real-time, non-virtual improvisation. All the players are physically present, often costumed, and usually in character. The most fundamental, universal aspect of LARPing is its basis in the live action that occurs, which distinguishes it from online and tabletop RPGs. The LARPing population is extremely diverse, and it is therefore difficult to make vast generalizations; the amount of in-character roleplaying depends entirely on the particular LARPing group’s members, and ranges from complex world creation systems and costumes to pure combat. However, improvisation is often, though certainly not always, an important aspect of the LARPing experience.

Beyond this description, it is difficult to create a concrete definition and history of LARPing. There are nearly as many manifestations as there are LARPers, and LARPing has no clear or linear history, though its origins include tabletop RPGs and historical reenactment. American LARPing is most commonly fantasy-based, and stereotypically based in medieval combat, though there are also groups that will focus on other time periods or contemporary fantasy concepts such as vampires.

The LAGS can be used by as few as two people, or by as many people as are interested. It is a system that takes many elements of LARPing styles and streamlines them for use with smaller groups of people who are mainly interested in fighting, and is therefore based on physical and mental skill rather than imaginary magical abilities. However, it still leaves room for expansion into other elements, such as costuming and role playing, if desired. There is also an element of healing for those who want to lay off the fighting and assist others during a battle, making the LAGS a platform for those who want to work together and forge strong bonds in battle.

Once you have built up your knowledge and skills related to the LAGS, you are ready to face this new world with sword drawn.

The World

Combat

LARPing is meant to be a safe way to fight with swords in a battle scenario. In order to make this a reality, there are rules that must be understood and followed, as well as proper equipment to be used. Just as in any other sport, practice is important, as are control and trust.

       Basic Rules

LARPing is very similar to the sword games most of us played as children. It involves foam swords and a simple set of rules.

  • If a sword hits your arm, your arm is no longer usable, and you must use only the arm you have left. You cannot switch usable arms.
  • If a sword hits your leg, your leg is unusable, and you must hop or go to your knees. You may not use it to assist in balance (i.e., resting weight on it).
  • If you have lost both of your arms, you cannot wield any weapons, and you must find a healer or die. However, if the last person standing has no arms, they still win because they are still alive.
  • Death is caused by being stabbed in either the back or the chest area.
  • The head and neck are off-limit areas and do not count. They should not be hit, for obvious safety reasons.
  • If you have lost an arm and the same arm is hit again, you die: it is as if the weapon goes through the arm (which is no longer there) and hits your torso, killing you. If the same leg is hit a second time, it is as if you are struck on your other leg, and you must kneel.
  • Hands are the exception to the rule. When they are attached to the weapon, they are protected by invisible gauntlets that cover them completely. When hit, you call out “hand on” and continue fighting. There is no need to stop the action. When your hand is not on the weapon, it counts as a part of your arm, and if it is hit you lose your whole arm.
  • If you think that you were killed or lost your arm before hitting another player, you should tell the other player not to take the hit, and they can use that part again. If two hits land at the same time, both players take the hit.

Calling Hits

When you are hit, you must call out your injury. For example, if you have lost your arm, you must call out “arm.” The same goes for “leg” or “dead.” If you accidentally call  your arm instead of your leg (or vice versa), you lose both. LARPing is an honor-based sport, and therefore you must make your own calls. You do not want to be a rhino––someone who charges ahead despite the fact that they have received numerous injuries––so it is always better to err on the side of taking more hits than you deserve.

A hit is determined when a weapon touches your limb, even lightly. LARPing is a lightest-contact sport; this means that you only have to barely touch an area with a weapon to disable your opponent. Even if the weapon touches your clothing, you should take the hit.  It is therefore advised that you do not wear loose or flowing clothing.

The body is broken down into hit areas. A leg is your hip down (including your butt), the chest is the area from your hip to your collarbone, an arm is your shoulder down to your wrist, and your hand is your wrist down to your fingers. Hits to the face and neck are out of bounds and do not count. Everywhere else on the body is fair game. This includes crotch shots, though these may be taken as kill shots if that is preferred; otherwise, the fight continues.

When you are dead, you are unable to speak or move; you may either remain standing or kneel down. You must signal that you are dead by placing either your fist or your weapon on your head. If you are in an area that is unsafe, you may move slightly one way or another until you are out of danger, but must then go back to being an unmoving corpse.

Dragging

The only way you are able to move when dead or “knocked out” (see below) is if you are “dragged” by a living player. Dragging is a simple concept in which the living player grabs the dead on the back or the arm and says “drag.” The two players then proceed to walk (no running) to where the living player wants to go––the dead player cannot lead the living player and must keep their arm on their head. This requires the living player to have at least one free arm left to drag with; this hand cannot be holding a weapon, since then there is no way to grab the other player. When they have reached their destination, the living player says “drop,” and the dead player drops to their knees, as they were before. A player cannot fight while dragging and must therefore drop the player before using their weapon. A player may be dragged by any other player––friend, foe, or neutral party.

Knocking out

If a game places a greater emphasis on role playing, knocking a player out may be a better option than killing them. This can be done by tapping them on the back with a weapon while saying “knap.” This attack is not affected by armor, and the player who has just been knocked out must drop to the ground immediately. Though the player is not dead, they are unable to move or speak for five minutes (which must be counted by the downed player). They may, however, be dragged by another player, with all the rules above applying––with the addition that if the knocked-out player regains consciousness while being dragged, they must be dropped immediately.

A player who is knocked out must call all shots, and can therefore can lose limbs and be killed. If a side needs their knocked-out player before the five minutes are up, a healer may use a limb heal on the player’s head or back, using up one of their bandages but reving the knocked-out player.

Armor

The number of hits taken to an area of the body can be increased by using 1- or 2-hit armor that adds extra touches to specific limbs or to the body, depending on where it is located. Thin leather (1-point) armor adds one extra touch; two-point armor is either made of chain mail or thick, inflexible leather, and adds two extra touches. Given that real leather and chainmail are expensive, alternatives to leather are allowed, such as fake leather (generally 1-point), and fabric-backed duct tape (2-point). Armor is not a necessity for play, but it can allow you to last longer, especially if you do not have a healer.

Armor is called similarly to normal hits, just with more points. If you are wearing 2-hit armor on, say, an arm, the first time it is hit you would call out “arm one,” and the second hit would be “arm two.” The third would be “arm,” and the arm would no longer be usable. The armor only protects what it is covering; for example, if a player is wearing bracers that only cover the bottom part of the arm and the bicep is hit, the player would lose the whole arm, since there is no protection there. Armor is not capable of being “repaired” during a fight and does not regenerate when one is healed or brought back to life.

Healing

Healing adds a more complex element to the game. A healer is able to assist players in getting back limbs and coming back to life during the fight. In a trade-off for these skills, healers have a lower weapons capability. Healers do not need to become apprentices, but do need to fully understand what they are doing and how to do it.

Healers must be clearly marked during play. This can be achieved by having them wear simple bands with a specific color or marking, so that all may know who they are. Healers are not allowed to use weapons longer than a dagger in length, and therefore must learn how to work with a team in order to survive. They cannot switch roles in the middle of an encounter. However, while switching in the middle of a fight is prohibited, a player can be a fighter one round and a healer the next, or vice versa. They are allowed to heal whomever they want, be it from their team or another.

Healers are skilled at fixing wounds on players, but not things made by man. For that reason, they are unable to fix armor when they heal. Though a limb may come back, whatever armor damage the player has received is still counted. Healing does not work if the injured person is being touched by an enemy weapon, the healer is killed, or the arm the healer is using is removed from the injured player during the healing.

Healers are not mandatory for gameplay, but can be a useful element. There is no limit to the number of healers present per battle as long as all the rules are being followed. Healers are used on a by-battle basis, meaning that the number of times they can heal (see Healing Techniques below) are renewed after each battle.

Healing Techniques

Heal limbs

Heal limbs does exactly what it sounds like: it returns a player’s limbs back to them, healing them fully. Ideally this would be done by wrapping a physical bandage around the player’s injured part. However, for safety reasons, the healer instead uses a specific phrase while touching the injured player in order to bring them back to health.

The healer must be in contact with the dead limb; for example, if the player is missing their right leg, the healer must be touching the right leg as they say the incantation, which is the verbal equivalent of putting on a bandage. Healing can only be done a set number of times. The phrase must be said loudly and clearly enough for the afflicted player to hear what is going on, so they know when they are healed. However, it is advised that the incantation be said as quickly as possible, while saying all of the words clearly, so that neither player is killed mid-process. If the incantation (a.k.a. wrapping the bandage) is interrupted, it does not take effect, and therefore must be done again. (An interrupted healing does not count as a used bandage.)

Healers are able to use this spell on themselves, though it still counts as a use of a bandage. Healers cannot fight while they are healing another, but the person they are helping can defend them both. A healer cannot heal with no arms; there must be at least one left (with which they can heal their other arm if they so choose). A healer can use two hands to heal two people at a time; one bandage per person is used up, as usual, but the phrase does not have to be repeated.

Below is the phrase that acts as a bandage:

“I wrap a bandage round your [arm/leg].”

The healer can use a total of 10 bandages per round.

Revive the dead

Reviving the dead is more complicated than healing a limb. Revival allows a single player to return to battle with all limbs intact. In more realistic terms, it is good field medicine and a shot of adrenaline to the player from a medkit, making them ready for action again. The healed receive all of their limbs back and are perfectly healthy again, but, as with heal limbs, they do not get back any armor. It is also achieved through contact, with the healer touching the head or back.

Healers are not able to revive themselves, since they are dead and can’t move. However, if there is more than one healer on a team, one healer can revive another.  A revived healer does not get any used bandages or revivals back, but retains previously unused bandages and revivals.

Once a healer runs out of bandages or medkits, they are essentially a fighter who can only use a dagger, so their skills must be used with care. With two arms, a healer can revive two people at a time; one medkit per person is used, but the phrase does not have to be repeated.

Below is the phrase that acts as a medkit:

“Turn back time and heal your wounds. You who hear the sound of my voice, rise and fight!”

Five medkits (player revivals) can can be used per round.

Safety

It is imperative to remain safe while LARPing. It does involve swinging a long piece of padded plastic around in a fairly fast-paced activity, so all players must be aware of the rules and committed to following them.

       Weapons Safety

Weapons should be made according to the specifications described below. This will prevent the PVC pipe used as the base from being exposed or accidentally hitting someone.

Control and Lightest Touch

LARPing is lightest-touch sport, and therefore requires significant control.  Swinging wildly is not acceptable. The weapon should not be thrown under any circumstances.  It is also imperative that you be aware of your surroundings at all times, especially if the area has trees, steep hills, buildings, innocent bystanders, bushes, etc.

The face and head are not targets, and while occasionally accidental headshots will happen, they do not count as hits and should be avoided.

Movement

Running is allowed during battle; however, like everything else, it should be done safely. You should not run at another player; this is called charging. You may run past them at full speed, but do not make as to run through them.

Honor

       Respect

The LAGS is a medieval-based LARP system and therefore comes with an interesting system of honor. It starts with a continuation of the statements made in safety; there must be trust between fighters and understanding that they both know and comprehend the rules. Though players are trying to kill each other, it is only done in play, and there should be no intention to cause any actual bodily harm. Because the community may be large, this trust may have to be extended to people who you do not know. Therefore, it is imperative that everyone follows the rules at all times in order prevent actual injuries. Good fighters who have strong control and skill should be looked up to in this.

This brings us to the second half of honor, which may tend toward a feudal system. This may be more variable across groups of LAGS participants. Some groups may want to have a larger role-playing aspect to their game, and therefore may set up a social hierarchy, including honorifics and other forms of distinguishing rank, such as clothing markers. Other groups may not want any role-playing elements, and thus may run their group so that members remain on more or less equal footing. Still other groups may fall somewhere in between.

If they wish, groups may also form factions ruled by different players who can then offer in-game protection from other factions’ aggressors. The primary rule of forming political factions is, “If you can back it up, you can do it.” Because the LAGS is a fighting-based system, you can call yourself the Queen of the East, but if you can’t back it up with any force––either with military strength or through gaining the respect and loyalty of your fellow players––it means nothing. However, if you can gather followers and march into the game with them at your back, you can call yourself whatever you want. Note that none of this can affect the rules; for example, you do NOT get extra hit points or any other special exceptions by joining a faction or declaring yourself the head of one.

Building a group or kingdom can be helpful in the game; knowing who has your best interests at heart can create a strong bond and a reason to fight, although it is not necessary for gameplay.

Starting play

The most honorable way to begin a one-on-one fight is obviously to face your opponent and start fighting only when both parties are ready. This can be achieved by “tapping on,” when both opponents tap their swords against each other’s, like tapping gloves in boxing, and then begin in a civilized manner. This should be done before all one-on-one tournament fights. Clearly this is only one way of doing it, however; you are also allowed to be dishonorable and stab people in the back.

For an honorable group or line fight, both teams should line up, and when the first team is prepared, the leader should raise their sword and wait till the leader of the second team does the same. When both teams are ready, the first team yells out, “Lay on,” and fighting commences. In team tournament fighting, after both teams raise their swords to signal they are ready, the ref is the one that yells “Lay on.”

Dress

Dress is a less essential part of the game, but can be fun. It can also be useful as a tool to form group cohesion. At minimum, the LAGS puts forward that groups who use this system wear a simple tabard during practices, and especially in tournaments. A basic tabard can be any color and is simply a rectangular piece of fabric with a hole cut in the middle for one’s head. It is then secured around the waist by a belt. Crests may be sewn on the tabard or the belt to display one’s affiliations with kingdoms and groups. Though one should not need to say this, one should not have profanity or rude marks on any of their equipment. Anything more is also acceptable and depends on the individual; for example, if one wants to get medieval-style pants and boots as well, that is encouraged but not necessary for gameplay.

Garb can be group- or kingdom-dependent, and can be adorned with crests and other designs as desired.

Though live steel is often allowed in renaissance faire garb, it is not acceptable in a LAGS game, for obvious safety reasons.

Breaking the rules

There are some who would rather break a game than play in a constructive manner. Though those people are best confronted nicely in order to deal with infractions, it is important for people to learn from their mistakes. With that said, there are some people who by their continual actions cause safety violations which could injure themselves or others. These people are not tolerated in the LAGS; because of the threat they pose, they must be removed from the game for the safety of all.

If personal disagreements should arise, these should be handled off the field; alternatively, anyone is free to start their own faction and resolve it in-game and within the rules.

Weapons

Types and combos

There are five lengths of weapons:

1’0″ – 2’1″ = Dagger

1’0″ – 3’8″ = Single Short

3’8″ – 5’0″ = Hand-and-a-Half

5’0″ – 6’6″ = Two-Handed

6’6″ – 8’0″ = Polearm (thrust only)

A dagger or a single short should only be wielded with one hand, but the other hand can also use another one-handed weapon or a shield. A hand-and-a-half can be wielded in one or two hands, but cannot be used in tandem with another weapon or shield. Two-handed weapons and polearms can only be used with two arms; if you lose an arm, you will be unable to wield that weapon until your arm is healed. Polearm weapons, i.e. spears, are a two-handed weapon and can only be thrust with; they are not swung from side to side. If you do swipe another player with a polearm, you should inform them not to take the shot.

With the exception of polearms, all padded parts of a weapon are considered striking surfaces and count as hits.

Shields are only meant for defense, and can be used with a one-handed weapon. They cannot be used to bash other players, and should not come into contact with other players’ bodies.

       Construction and Care

Weapons must be built in a specific way in order to ensure the safety of all players.

Materials

  • ¾” PVC pipe?
  • (thickness) Foam?
  • Clear packing tape
  • Duct tape (one or more colors)
  • 2 quarters per weapon
  • Hacksaw (or other instrument for cutting PVC)
  • if you purchase PVC from certain hardware stores, it can sometimes be cut to request
  • Scissors

Building your boffer: (we need to make one and photograph each step as well as document the process)

       Boffer

Crossguard

Axes

Alternative weapons

Building your Shield

Shields can be made using concave plastic sleds or ¼-inch-thick plywood boards. Ideally, they should be no higher than your waist when placed on the ground, though smaller shields are fine. (Size) foam should surround the circumference of the shield and be covered and secured by duct tape for safety/protection. The shield should not be used as weapon and should not have any weapons mounted it. Therefore, nothing should protrude off of the face or the back of the shield.

All shields must be strapped to the user’s arm and must also have a handle for the hand, for ease of use. These can be made with old belt straps or other such materials, and should be secured using nuts and bolts in as safe a manner as possible. Make sure that the top part of the screw is on the face of the shield; the strap should be placed on the screw on the back of the shield. Another washer should be placed next to ensure that the end of the screw is on the outside of the handle (and not on the inside, where your hand or arm will be). It should all be secured by a bolt. This should all be repeated on the other side of the band and with the other side, which should go over and secure your forearm.

If your shield arm is hit, you must remove your shield, just as when you lose an arm holding a weapon you must drop that weapon. If the shield is hit after you have lost the arm, you must call yourself dead, because the weapon is considered to have gone through your lost shield and hit you. Therefore, it is a good idea to have a quick release method or straps that are not too tight.

Shields may be painted, though spray paint is not recommended, since it does not show up as well and brush paint looks better.

       Weapon care

Weapons should be inspected regularly to make sure that the tip is still soft and will not injure other players. Padding should also be inspected along the shaft to make sure that is not ripped. One should also make sure that the duct tape is still in place and has not raised. If that occurs, remove and replace the affected area. The same goes for shields. Using common sense here goes a long way.

Weapons should always be stored upright, so that the handle is on the floor and the tip is in the air, leaning against a wall. This rule applies to all weapons; it protects both the weapons’ tips and your fellow players. For the same reason, weapon points should never touch the ground. This prevents the top from getting damaged and stops it from it collecting dirt and rocks. This is an issue of safety, and subsequently becomes one of respect and honor. If you expect people to protect you with their weapons and not grind them into the dirt, you should set a worthy example.

       Armor rules and construction

Fighting

Strategy

       Fighters

Different weapons have different fighting styles associated them, but it’s recommended to gain some experience with both single and hand-and-a-half swords. Single swords require more speed and a certain level of ambidextrousness, since if you lose one arm, you must drop the sword held in that hand. A hand-and-a-half allows you to attack from farther away.

       Healers

Healers need to be able to speak quickly and remember the phrases under pressure.  They cannot act aggressively or work independently from the fighters in their group, especially on smaller teams. If a healer strays too far away from their team’s fighters, they make easy targets for the opposing team. Many healers will keep one hand on a fighter so that the fighter can defend them and have immediate access to healing. It is a healer’s priority to keep their fighters alive, and there is no reason for them to go off on their own, except possibly in the case of healing a dead teammate. Even in this situation, however, healers should be accompanied by another fighter when possible.

If playing with Healers, one fighter should stay near the body when an opposing player has been killed so that the dead player’s healers do not have a chance to heal them.

Training Exercises

In order to learn effective strategy for different combat situations, players should practice with a number of different training activities.

Line Battles

  1. Divide into two equal teams, which start at either end of the field
  2. One player declares “Lay on,” and the teams approach each other and fight until all members on one team are dead
  3. If there is an odd number of people, the losing team is able to choose one player from the winning team (this happens even if the smaller team wins)
  4. This is the most basic team exercise, since a team will only succeed if they work together; a smaller team can win against a larger one if they work as a unit.

Line Battles with Healers

  1. This works exactly as normal line battles do, except with different combinations of Healers on each/either team
  2. Each team can have a healer, or one team can have all fighters while the other has fewer fighters, but several healers.

Rotations

  1. This is a free-for-all game in which all players begin in the fight
  2. When a player is killed, they must go and sit out the fight to the side until the player who killed them is killed; they then re-enter the fight
  3. This continues until one player has killed every other player.

Games

Damsel in Distress Game

  1. One player is marked as the damsel
  2. The Damsel is jailed at opposite end of field
  3. The goal of the defending team is to keep Damsel in jail until everyone on rescuing team is killed, with the Damsel left alive
  4. The rescuing team wins if the Damsel is rescued and brought back to their side alive
  5. The Damsel cannot leave the jail unless dragged out by teammate
  6. The Damsel is initially unarmed, but can be given a weapon by a teammate; when they are brought back to jail, they are stripped of any weapon(s)
  7. When not being dragged, they have no lower legs and must walk on their knees (if dragged, they are allowed to walk on their feet)
  8. The Damsel must be alive for either team to win (i.e. if both healers are dead, and the damsel is killed, no one wins)
  9. The Damsel cannot do anything except speak, and only when alive; they can fight (from their knees) if they obtain a weapon.
  10. Damsels take no leg damage, and cannot be healers
  11. The Damsel must be alive for the rescuing team to drag her any farther than outside the jail.
  12. Variation: One healer may have the job of keeping the Damsel alive.

Protect the King

  1. One player is designated King
  2. The defending team must keep the king alive; the attacking team must try to kill the King
  3. The King cannot be resurrected, but their limbs can be healed
  4. The King can fight like a normal player, but cannot be a healer
  5. The game ends when the attacking team kills the king or all the attackers are dead.
  6. Variation: Both sides have a king.

Holy Grail

  1. One team hides an object; the other team must find it
  2. The game is won when the defending team kills the entire search team, or when the searching team finds the object
  3. The defending team does not have healers
  4. Option of questioning: a defending player must truthfully tell where the object is if missing all limbs, but cannot be killed after providing this information.  If they tell you the information before losing limbs, they can switch sides
  5. One person must be within five feet of the object at all times (though a corpse counts)
  6. The searching team is larger than the defending team
  7. The object can be moved.
  8. Optional: One person is the designated leader, who knows where the object is.

Robin Hood

  1. Every player has an item which they carry on them––their “gold” (could be a scarf or a pouch, etc.)
  2. When they are killed or knocked out, the gold can be stolen
  3. The goal of each individual player is to have all the gold
  4. A successful thief must carry the gold on them at all times, meaning it can be taken by another party
  5. Can also work with three or more teams.

Wizard

  1. Small team vs. large team
  2. Small team has a player (the Wizard) who can force players on the opposite team to switch by touching them with their hands
  3. The Wizard does not take limb shots, but can die
  4. The Wizard can only use a dagger, and cannot heal.

Butterfly

  1. The Butterfly has no weapons to start
  2. Both teams want the Butterfly, but cannot kill them
  3. The Butterfly wins if both teams manage to kill each other
  4. The Butterfly can pick up the weapons of dead people
  5. When the Butterfly is not holding a weapon, they cannot be injured; when holding a weapon, they can lose arms––but not legs––and still cannot die.
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